Presentations

Symposia:

“Using narrative to navigate.” Invited panelist, Hamline University English Department Midwinter Workshop, Hamline University, St. Paul, MN, January 17, 2017.

“Brainwashing soap:  Methods for increasing credulity.”  Invited colloquium presentation and discussion, Faculty Research Colloquium, Hamline University, St. Paul, MN, November, 11, 2016.

Why we believe more than disbelieve: An error or a smart move?” Invited colloquium presentation and discussion, Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, Conference XI, Victoria, BC, June 24, 2015.

Invited Lectures:

“The mirage of free will: What physics and neuroscience tell us about our beliefs and choices.” Invited lecture, Physics Seminar, Hamline University, October 7, 2016.

“Creativity and psychology.”  Invited lecture, Advanced Creative Nonfiction: Workshop class, Hamline University, November 2, 2015.

“Do lesions to the prefrontal cortex create authoritarian individuals? Implications for individual differences in cognitive functioning and authoritarianism.” Invited lecture, Political Psychology Workshop, University of Chicago, May 24, 2013.

“Doubt deficit: A vulnerability toward belief following damage to the prefrontal cortex.” Invited lecture, Social Neuroscience Meeting, University of Chicago, January 19, 2012.

“Doubt deficit: Poor functioning of the prefrontal cortex.” Invited lecture, Neuroscience Seminar, University of Iowa, September 20, 2011.

“False Tagging Theory: Mechanisms of belief and doubt in the brain.” Invited lecture, Neuroscience Seminar, University of Iowa, August 31, 2010.

“The ventromedial prefrontal cortex and its role in belief systems: Religiosity and general beliefs.” Invited lecture, St. Olaf Neuroscience Day, St. Olaf College, November 17, 2009.

“Changes in religiosity following brain damage.” Invited lecture, Neuroscience Seminar, University of Iowa, April 15, 2008.

“The prefrontal cortex’s influence on causality.” Invited lecture, Neuroscience Seminar, University of Iowa, December 15, 2008.

“Naming dynamic and static actions: Neuropsychological evidence.” Rotation lecture, Neuroscience Seminar, University of Iowa, June 5, 2007.

Conferences:

“Sleep deprivation increases credulity to explicitly-labeled false information.”  Poster presentation, Association for Psychological Science, Boston, MA.  To be given May 26, 2017 at board #VIII-90.

“Authoritarian, just-world, and prejudicial beliefs predict cognitive inconsistency.” Poster presentation, Association for Psychological Science, Chicago, IL, May 27, 2016.

“No effect of acute stress on anchoring and adjustment, nor gist-based false memories.” Poster presentation, Society for Neuroscience, Chicago, IL, October 19, 2015.

“Damage to the amygdala increases credulity to explicitly-labeled false information.” Poster presentation, Association for Psychological Science, New York, NY, May 24, 2015.

“The role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in susceptibility to pseudoscientific, conspiracy theory, and paranormal beliefs.”  Poster presentation, Association for Psychological Science, New York, NY, May 24, 2015.

“Damage to the vmPFC increases leniency of prison sentencing toward individuals who commit violent crimes.” Poster presentation, Cognitive Neuroscience Society, Boston, MA, 2014 and SURF, Iowa City, IA, 2014.

“DTI tracks credulity to explicitly-labeled false information in patients with schizophrenia.” Poster presentation, Cognitive Neuroscience Society, Boston, MA, April, 2014.

“Early prefrontal lesions impair the maturation of moral judgments.” Poster presentation, Society for Philosophy and Psychology, Providence, RI, June 14, 2013.

“Older adults and patients with damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex exhibit credulity to explicitly-labeled false information.” Poster presentation, Mechanisms of Motivation, Cognition, and Aging Interactions, Washington, DC, May 1-4, 2013.

“Increased egocentric moral judgments after developmental-onset ventromedial prefrontal cortex damage.” Poster presentation, Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting, Seattle, WA, April 18-20, 2013.

“Damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex increases credulity to explicitly-labeled false information.” Poster presentation, Social and Affective Neuroscience Society Conference, New York, NY, April 20, 2012.

“Patients with damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex report increased explicit prejudice.” Poster presentation, Society for Neuroscience Conference, Washington, D.C., November 16, 2011.

“Patients with temporal lobe lesions do not report decreased religious/mystical experiences.” Poster presentation, Society for Neuroscience Conference, San Diego, CA, November 17, 2010.

“Damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex increases religious beliefs.” Poster presentation, James F. Jakobsen Graduate Conference, Iowa City, IA, March 27, 2010.

“Changes in religiosity following brain damage.” Poster presentation, Society for Neuroscience Conference, Chicago, IL, November 19, 2009.

“Vulnerability to deceptive advertising and its neural correlates.” Poster presentation, Society for Neuroscience Conference, Chicago, IL, November 17, 2009.

“Naming dynamic and static actions: Neuropsychological evidence.” Poster presentation, Society for Neuroscience Conference, November 7, 2007.